Open World Design in Blender

Open World Design in Blender

Open World Design in video games is becoming widely popular. Gamers are seeking games that are more advanced. For the most part, linear games are loosing their interest, and new ways of gaming are being developed, hence games like World of Warcraft and Eve Online. Are you looking to create an open world but don’t know where to start? These tips will steer you in the right direction. Level Design You say you are worried about the cost of such a huge scene in the editing process. A valid worry but ask yourself this; Why edit it all in the one scene? For each area that your world is divided up into make a separate blend file. Group the entire map together as a single blender group and link the group into your final file. Now arrange these objects in your final file to make your world and you can edit each section separately in their own file. The results will be automatically transferred to the final blend file. LOD (Level of Detail) There are many prototypes for LOD (Level of detail) in Blender. It can be done with python and even with logic bricks. You want to carefully map out how to run your LOD system for each section and for the map as a whole. Remember also to use the lowest LOD level as the object seen when editing the map. Since in the 3D viewport all the objects will be giving their impact you want to be using the versions with the lowest poly-count to avoid editing impact. Heavy use of occluders Occluders are a relatively...
10 Great Features Of Blender

10 Great Features Of Blender

If all you know about Blender is that it’s free to download, maybe it’s time you took another look. There’s a number of free 3D software packages available for download online. One of the most popular open source software is Blender 3D. Over the last few years, its development has really forged ahead and while many of its idiosyncrasies remain, there’s a lot of good stuff in there of use to CG artists and illustrators. In fact, the software has come so far in recent years, that Blender enthusiasts all over the world are branching out into 3D movies, currently working on a feature animation The Gooseberry project. You can master the software with this brilliant selection of Blender tutorials. But before you do, read on for some interesting facts about Blender; some you might know, a few you probably won’t – and a couple of things that took us by surprise too… 1. You can render with it Blender Cycles offers stunning ultra-realistic rendering. Of course you know you can create images with Blender, but did you know it has a GPU-accelerated unbiased render engine, called Cycles? As long as you have a CUDA-compliant graphics card, you’ll get realtime rendering in the main display. Not only does this help Blender artists work more quickly and efficiently, but with Cycles’ global illumination the images are much more photo-real. The latest version of Cycles has an improved sky model, blackbody emissive materials, hair rendering and tone mapping – and the next one will feature volumetrics. 2. You can simulate fluids You can use Blender to make anything from splashing liquids...
Meet Blender 3D

Meet Blender 3D

In 1988, Ton Roosendaal co-founded the Dutch animation studio NeoGeo. This studio quickly became the largest 3D animation house in the Netherlands. Within NeoGeo, Ton was responsible for both art direction and internal software development. After a careful deliberation it was decided that the current in-house 3D tool-set needed to be rewritten from scratch. In 1995 this rewrite began and was destined to become the 3D software tool we all now know as Blender. Ton founded a new company called Not a Number (NaN), to further market and develop Blender. NaN’s business model involved providing commercial products and services around Blender. In 2000 the company secured growth financing by several investment companies. Target was to create a free creation tool for interactive 3D (on-line) content, and commercial versions of the software for distribution and publishing. Sadly, due to disappointing sales and the ongoing difficult economic climate, the NaN investors decided to shut down all operations early 2002. The shutdown also included discontinuing the development of Blender. Enthusiastic support from the user community and customers couldn’t justify leaving Blender to disappear into oblivion. Since restarting a company with a sufficiently large team of developers wasn’t feasible, in May 2002 Ton Roosendaal started the non-profit Blender Foundation. The Blender Foundation’s first goal was to find a way to continue developing and promoting Blender as a community based open source project. In July 2002, Ton managed to get the NaN investors to agree on a unique Blender Foundation plan to attempt to open source Blender. The “Free Blender” campaign sought to raise 100,000 EUR, as a one-time fee so that the NaN...
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